AFNI program: 1dplot.py

Output of -help




OVERVIEW ~1~

This program is for making images to visualize columns of numbers from
"1D" text files.  It is based heavily on RWCox's 1dplot program, just
using Python (particularly matplotlib).  To use this program, Python
version >=2.7 is required, as well as matplotlib modules (someday numpy 
might be needed, as well).

This program takes very few required options-- mainly, file names and
an output prefix-- but it allows the user to control/add many
features, such as axis labels, titles, colors, adding in censor
information, plotting summary boxplots and more.

++ constructed by PA Taylor (NIMH, NIH, USA).

# =========================================================================

COMMAND OPTIONS ~1~

-help, -h     :see helpfile

-infiles II   :(req) one or more file names of text files.  Each column
               in this file will be treated as a separate time series
               for plotting (i.e., as 'y-values').  One can use
               AFNI-style column '{ }' and row '[ ]' selectors.  One
               or more files may be entered, but they must all be of 
               equal length.
-yfiles YY    :exactly the same behavior as "-infiles ..", just another
               option name for it that might be more consistent with
               other options.

-prefix  PP   :output filename or prefix; if no file extension for an
               image is included in 'PP', one will be added from a
               list.  At present, OK file types to output should include:
                  .jpg, .png, .tif, .pdf
               ... but note that the kinds of image files you may output
               may be limited by packages (or lack thereof) installed on
               your own computer.   Default output image type is .jpg

-boxplot_on   :a fun feature to show an small, additional boxplot
               adjacent to each time series.  The plot is a standard
               Python boxplot of that times series's values.  The box
               shows the 25-75%ile range (interquartile range, IQR);
               the median value highlighted by a white line; whiskers
               stretch to 1.5*IQR; circles show outliers.
               When using this option and censoring, by default both a
               boxplot of data "before censoring" (BC) and "after
               censoring (AC) will be added after.  See '-bplot_view ...'
               about current opts to change that, if desired.

-bplot_view BC_ONLY | AC_ONLY
              :when using '-boxplot_on' and censoring, by default the
               plotter will put one boxplot of data "before censoring"
               (BC) and after censoring (AC). To show *only* the
               uncensored one, use this option and keyword.

-margin_off   :use this option to have the plot frame fill the figure
               window completely; thus, no labels, frame, titles or
               other parts of the 'normal' image outside the plot
               window will be visible.  Tick lines will still be
               present, living their best lives.
               This is probably only useful/recommended/tested for
               plots with a single panel.

-scale  SCA1 SCA2 SCA3 ...
              :provide a list of scales to apply to the y-values.
               These will be applied multiplicatively to the y-values;
               there should either be 1 (applied to all time series)
               or the same number as the time series (in the same
               order as those were entered).  The scale values are
               also applied to the censor_hline values, but *not* to
               the "-yaxis ..." range(s). 
               Note that there are a couple keywords that can be used
               instead of SCA* values:
                   SCALE_TO_HLINE: each input time series is
                      vertically scaled so that its censor_hline -> 1.
                      That is, each time point is divided by the
                      censor_hline value.  When using this, a visually
                      pleasing yaxis range might be 0:3.
                   SCALE_TO_MAX: each input time series is
                      vertically scaled so that its max value -> 1.
                      That is, each time point is divided by the
                      max value. When using this, a visually
                      pleasing yaxis range might be 0:1.1.

-xfile   XX   :one way to input x-values explicitly: as a "1D" file XX, a
               containing a single file of numbers.  If no xfile is 
               entered, then a list of integers is created, 0..N-1, based
               on the length of the "-infiles ..".
               
-xvals START STOP STEP
              :an alternative means for entering abscissa values: one
               can provide exactly 3 numbers, the start (inclusive)
               the stop (exclusive) and the steps to take, following
               Python conventions-- that is, numbers are generated
               [START,STOP) in stepsizes of STEP.

-yaxis YMIN1:YMAX1 YMIN2:YMAX2 YMIN3:YMAX3 ...
              :optional range for each "infile" y-axis; note the use
              of a colon to designate the min/max of the range.  One
              can also specify just the min (e.g., "YMIN:") or just
              the max (e.g., ":YMAX"). The final number of y-axis
              values or pairs *must* match the total number of columns
              of data from infiles; a placeholder could just be
              ":". Without specifying a range, one is calculated
              automatically from the min and max of the dsets
              themselves. The order of ylabels should match the order
              of infiles.

-ylabels YL1 YL2 YL3 ...
              :optional text labels for each "infile" column; the
               final number of ylabels *must* match the total number
               of columns of data from infiles.  For 1D files output
               by 3dvolreg, one can automatically provide the 6
               associated ylabels by providing the keyword 'VOLREG'
               (and this counts as 6 labels).  The order of ylabels
               should match the order of infiles.
               These labels are plotted vertically along the y-axis of the
               plot.

-legend_on    :turn on the plotting of a legend in the plot(s).  Legend
               will not be shown in the boxplot panels, if using.

-legend_labels LL1 LL2 LL3 ...
              :optional legend labels, if using '-legend_on' to show a
               legend.  If no arguments are provided for this option,
               then the labels will be the arguments to '-infiles ..'
               (or '-yfiles ..').  If arguments ARE input, then they must
               match the number of '-infiles ..' (or '-yfiles ..').

-legend_locs  LOC1 LOC2 LOC3 ...
              :optional legend locations, if using '-legend_on' to
               show a legend.  If no arguments are provided for this
               option, then the locations will be the ones picked by
               Python (reasonable starting point) If arguments ARE
               input, then they must match the number of '-infiles ..'
               (or '-yfiles ..').  Valid entries are strings
               recognizable by matplotlib's plt.legend()'s "loc" opt;
               this includes: 'best', 'right', 'upper right', 'lower
               right', 'center right', etc. Note that if you use a
               two-word argument here, you MUST put it in quotes (or,
               as a special treat, you can combine it with an
               underscore, and it will be parsed correctly.  So, valid
               values of LOC* could be:
                  left
                  'lower left'
                  upper_center

-xlabel XL    :optional text labels for the abscissa/x-axis.  Only one may  
               be entered, and it will *only* be displayed on the bottom 
               panel of the output plot.  Using labels is good practice!!

 
-title TT     :optional title for the set of plots, placed above the top- 
               most subplot

-reverse_order :optional switch; by default, the entered time series
               are plotted top to bottom according to the order they
               were entered (i.e., first- listed plot at the top).
               This option reverses that order (to first-listed plot
               at the bottom), in order to match with 1dplot's
               behavior.

-sepscl       :make each graph have its own y-range, determined by
               slightly padding its min and max values.  By default,
               the separate plots all have the same y-range, which
               is determined by taking the min-of-mins and max-of-
               maxes, and padding slightly outward.  

-one_graph    :plot multiple infiles in a single subplot (default is to put
               each one in a new subplot).

-dpi DDD      :choose the output image's DPI.  The default value is
               150.

-figsize FX FY :choose the output image's dimensions (units are inches).  
                The default width is 10; the default height
                is 0.5 + N*0.75, where 'N' is the number of 
                infile columns.

-fontsize FS   :change image fontsize; default is 10.

-fontfamily FF :change font-family used; default is the luvly
                monospace.

-fontstyles FSS :add in a fontname; should match with chosen
                font-family; default is whatever Python has on your
                system for the given family.  Whether your prescribed
                font gets used depends on what is installed on your
                comp.

-colors C1 C2 C3 ...
               :you can decide what color(s) to cycle through in plots
                (enter one or more); if there are more infile columns
                than entered colors, the program just keeps cycling
                through the list. By default, if only 1 infile column is
                given, the plotline will be black; when more than one
                infile column is given, a default palette of 10
                colors, chosen for their mutual-distinguishable-ness,
                will be cycled through.
                One of the colors can also be a decimal in range [0.0, 1.0],
                which will correspond to grayscale in range [black, white],
                respectively.

-patches RL1 RL2 RL3 ...
               :when viewing data from multiple runs that have been
                processing+concatenated, knowing where they start/stop
                can be useful. This option helps with that, by
                alternating patches of the background slightly between
                white and light gray.  The user enters any appropriate
                number of run lengths, and the background patch for
                the duration of the first is white, then light gray,
                etc. (to *start* with light gray, one can have '0' be
                the first RL value).

-censor_trs CS1 CS2 CS3 ...
               :specify time points where censoring has occured (e.g.,
                due to a motion or outlier criterion).  With this
                option, the values are entered using AFNI index
                notation, such as '0..3,8,25,99..$'.  Note that if you
                use special characters like the '$', then the given
                string must be enclosed on quotes.  
                One or more string can be entered, and results are
                simply combined (as well as if censor files are
                entered-- see the '-censor_files ..' opt).
                In order to highlight censored points, a translucent
                background color will be added to all plots of width 1.

-censor_files CF1 CF2 CF3 ...
               :specify time points where censoring has occured (e.g.,
                due to a motion or outlier criterion).  With this
                option, the values are entered as 1D files, columns
                where 0 indicates censoring at that [i]th time point,
                and 1 indicates *no* censoring there.  
                One or more file can be entered, and results are
                simply combined (as well as if censor strings are
                entered-- see the '-censor_str ..' opt).  
                In order to highlight censored points, a translucent
                background color will be added to all plots of width 1.

-censor_hline CH1 CH2 CH3 ...
               :one can add a dotted horizontal line to the plot, with
                the intention that it represents the relevant threshold
                (for example, motion limit or outlier fraction limit).
                One can specify more than one hline: if one line
                is entered, it will be applied to each plot; if more
                than one hline is entered, there must be the same number
                of values as infile columns. 
                Ummm, it is also assumed that all censor hline values 
                are >=0; if negative, it will be a problem-- ask if this
                is a problem!
                A value of 'NONE' can also be input, to be a placeholder
                in a list, when some subplots have censor_hline values
                and others don't.

-censor_RGB COL :choose the color of the censoring background; default
                is: [1, 0.7, 0.7].

-bkgd_color BC :change the background color outside of the plot
                windows.  Default is the Python color: 0.9.

EXAMPLES ~1~

1) Plot Euclidean norm (enorm) profile, with the censor limit and
   related file of censoring:
1dplot.py                                    \
    -sepscl                                  \
    -boxplot_on                              \
    -infiles      motion_sub-10506_enorm.1D  \
    -censor_files motion_sub-10506_censor.1D \
    -censor_hline 0.2                        \
    -title   "Motion censoring"              \
    -ylabels enorm                           \
    -xlabel  "vols"                          \
    -title   "Motion censoring"              \
    -prefix  mot_cen_plot.jpg

2) Plot the 6 solid body parameters from 3dvolreg, along with
   the useful composite 'enorm' and outlier time series:
1dplot.py                                    \
    -sepscl                                  \
    -boxplot_on                              \
    -reverse_order                           \
    -infiles      dfile_rall.1D              \
                  motion_sub-10506_enorm.1D  \
                  outcount_rall.1D           \
    -ylabels  VOLREG enorm outliers          \
    -xlabel  "vols"                          \
    -title   "Motion and outlier plots"      \
    -prefix  mot_outlier_plot.png

3) Use labels and locations to plot 3dhistog output (there will
   be some minor whining about failing to process comment label
   *.1D files, but won't cause any problems for plot); here, 
   legend labels will be the args after '-yfiles ..' (with the 
   part in square brackets, but without the quotes):
1dplot.py                                    \
    -xfile  HOUT_A.1D'[0]'                   \
    -yfiles HOUT_A.1D'[1]' HOUT_B.1D'[1]'    \
    -prefix img_histog.png                   \
    -colors blue 0.6                         \
    -boxplot_on                              \
    -legend_on 

4) Same as #3, but using some additional opts to control legends.
   Here, am using 2 different formats of providing the legend
   locations in each separate subplot, just for fun:
1dplot.py                                    \
    -xfile  HOUT_A.1D'[0]'                   \
    -yfiles HOUT_A.1D'[1]' HOUT_B.1D'[1]'    \
    -prefix img_histog.png                   \
    -colors blue 0.6                         \
    -boxplot_on                              \
    -legend_on                               \
    -legend_locs upper_right "lower left"    \
    -legend_labels A B




This page auto-generated on Mon Oct 19 20:22:41 EDT 2020