AFNI program: 3dproject

Output of -help


*+ WARNING: This program (3dproject) is old, not maintained, and probably useless!
Projection along cardinal axes from a 3D dataset
Usage: 3dproject [editing options]
        [-sum|-max|-amax|-smax] [-output root] [-nsize] [-mirror]
        [-RL {all | x1 x2}] [-AP {all | y1 y2}] [-IS {all | z1 z2}]
        [-ALL] dataset

Program to produce orthogonal projections from a 3D dataset.
  -sum     ==> Add the dataset voxels along the projection direction
  -max     ==> Take the maximum of the voxels [the default is -sum]
  -amax    ==> Take the absolute maximum of the voxels
  -smax    ==> Take the signed maximum of the voxels; for example,
                -max  ==> -7 and 2 go to  2 as the projected value
                -amax ==> -7 and 2 go to  7 as the projected value
                -smax ==> -7 and 2 go to -7 as the projected value
  -first x ==> Take the first value greater than x
  -nsize   ==> Scale the output images up to 'normal' sizes
               (e.g., 64x64, 128x128, or 256x256)
               This option only applies to byte or short datasets.
  -mirror  ==> The radiologists' and AFNI convention is to display
               axial and coronal images with the subject's left on
               the right of the image; the use of this option will
               mirror the axial and coronal projections so that
               left is left and right is right.

  -output root ==> Output projections will named
                   root.sag, root.cor, and root.axi
                   [the default root is 'proj']

  -RL all      ==> Project in the Right-to-Left direction along
                   all the data (produces root.sag)
  -RL x1 x2    ==> Project in the Right-to-Left direction from
                   x-coordinate x1 to x2 (mm)
                   [negative x is Right, positive x is Left]
                   [OR, you may use something like -RL 10R 20L
                        to project from x=-10 mm to x=+20 mm  ]

  -AP all      ==> Project in the Anterior-to-Posterior direction along
                   all the data (produces root.cor)
  -AP y1 y2    ==> Project in the Anterior-to-Posterior direction from
                   y-coordinate y1 to y2 (mm)
                   [negative y is Anterior, positive y is Posterior]
                   [OR, you may use something like -AP 10A 20P
                        to project from y=-10 mm to y=+20 mm  ]

  -IS all      ==> Project in the Inferior-to-Superior direction along
                   all the data (produces root.axi)
  -IS y1 y2    ==> Project in the Inferior-to-Superior direction from
                   z-coordinate z1 to z2 (mm)
                   [negative z is Inferior, positive z is Superior]
                   [OR, you may use something like -IS 10I 20S
                        to project from z=-10 mm to z=+20 mm  ]

  -ALL         ==> Equivalent to '-RL all -AP all -IS all'

* NOTE that a projection direction will not be used if the bounds aren't
   given for that direction; thus, at least one of -RL, -AP, or -IS must
   be used, or nothing will be computed!
* NOTE that in the directions transverse to the projection direction,
   all the data is used; that is, '-RL -5 5' will produce a full sagittal
   image summed over a 10 mm slice, irrespective of the -IS or -AP extents.
* NOTE that the [editing options] are the same as in 3dmerge.
   In particular, the '-1thtoin' option can be used to project the
   threshold data (if available).

INPUT DATASET NAMES
-------------------
This program accepts datasets that are modified on input according to the
following schemes:
  'r1+orig[3..5]'                                    {sub-brick selector}
  'r1+orig<100..200>'                                {sub-range selector}
  'r1+orig[3..5]<100..200>'                          {both selectors}
  '3dcalc( -a r1+orig -b r2+orig -expr 0.5*(a+b) )'  {calculation}
For the gruesome details, see the output of 'afni -help'.

++ Compile date = Dec 11 2018 {AFNI_18.3.16:linux_ubuntu_16_64}


This page auto-generated on Tue Dec 11 18:13:35 EST 2018